Asemic writing: TEXERE

asemic-writing

Miriam Midley is a textile artist with a respectable list of exhibitions in her native country of Argentina as well as Brazil, an online exhibition (The Volta-Women of the Visual Art, Coldfront Magazine-Vispo), and she is currently in UTSANGA: A collective asemic writing show at Roccelletta di Borgia’s Parco Archeologico Scolacium, Italy from December 2nd, 2016 to May 2nd, 2017.

asemic-writing-expo

UTSANGA Asemic Writing Exhibition | 57 autori in mostra a Roccelletta di Borgia | Dal 2 dicembre 2016 al 2 maggio 2017

texereMiriam’s work concept derives from the Latin word, TEXERE: A weave we use to construct history. Thus, with each turn over, the weaver constructs her own history and her own culture. Also, it is noted that words materialize in the writing being woven, over and over, to transform ideas into a system of communication.

The piece was made with paper and ink, and measures 145 X 115 cm divide into modules of 22 X 28 cm each, mounted on a wooden frame.

 

texere-detalle-1Each module is woven and has its own writing, which Miriam has named, “Calligraphic Gestures“. Her writing has no semantic sense, nor does it belong to any particular language.

 

texere-detalle-4Texere follows the idea of joining weaving with writing in order to make us delve into the Memory of our tongue.

 

Contact: miriam 

 

 

Blog: https://miriammidley.blogspot.com.ar/

texere-detalle-2Email: miriam.midley@fibertel.com.ar

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

7th Biennial in Uruguay 2017

Some people have told me they find the WTA 7th Biennial “so expensive” ($80).
I have to say, we can’t view a large biennial [such as this one,] only in terms of its monetary fee. Biennial competitions are not for selling artwork! Selling may or may not come later, but these shows are usually held in museums and places where selling isn’t possible. On the plus side, participants usually receive the opportunity to show their work in a prestigious setting, and use it for résumé purposes. WTA offers much more than other exhibits as far as the following facts:
Being the largest in Central/South America, it keeps an enormous number of textile artists going, showing and creating, in addition to encouraging comradery and communication among them.
WTA pays a lot of attention to sensory and textile development in children and persons with visual impairment. Its social work is constant, and important.
Its biennials are enthusiastic festivals full of participation, fun, workshops, conferences, and field trips. The same enthusiasm escapes into the city where these activities are being held, making the public notice and attend the shows in a much more attentive way.
Artists who participate in this type of exhibits usually have to conform to format and date specifications, pay their entry fee, subject themselves to being judged, and if accepted they pay for transportation of their work. Therefore, WTA is serious about the importance to promote the event, show lots of pictures, and make sure that participants have a wonderful experience. It is a give-and-take where the selected artist gains needed recognition and support.
Those of us who have been in WTA biennials in the past, are really excited about the upcoming 7th in Uruguay 2017. If you’re into textiles, you should consider it, too!
http://www.wta-online.org/

Hay quienes me han dicho que consideran la VII Bienal “tan cara” ($80).
Tengo que decirles que no podemos ver una bienal tan grande como ésta, solo en términos de su cuota de participación. ¡Estas competencias no son para vender! Las ventas llegarán o no en un futuro, pero estas muestras se llevan a cabo en museos y lugares donde no es posible vender. Del lado positivo, los participantes normalmente reciben la oportunidad de mostrar su trabajo en un lugar de prestigio y usar esta participación para efectos de currículum. Al respecto, WTA ofrece mucho más que otras exhibiciones en cuanto a lo siguiente:
Por ser la más grande en Centroamérica y Suramérica, mantiene a un gran número de artistas textiles activos, creando y mostrando, además de promover camaradería y comunicación entre ellos.
WTA pone mucha atención al desarrollo sensorial y textil en niños y en personas con discapacidad visual. Su labor social es constante e importante.
Sus bienales son festivales entusiastas, llenos de participación, alegría, talleres, conferencias y paseos de campo. Ese mismo entusiasmo se escapa hacia la ciudad donde se realicen sus actividades, logrando así que el público aprecie y participe con más atención.
Los artistas participantes en este tipo de exposición, normalmente deben ajustarse a especificaciones de formato y fechas, pagar la cuota, someterse a ser juzgados y, de ser seleccionados, deben pagar por el transporte de su obra. Por eso, la WTA toma seriamente la importancia de promover el evento, mostrar muchas fotos y asegurarse de que los participantes tengan una maravillosa experiencia. Es un dar y recibir donde el artista seleccionado obtiene su necesario reconocimiento.
Quienes hemos participado en bienales WTA en el pasado, nos sentimos emocionados por la próxima VII en Uruguay 2017. ¡Si el textil es lo tuyo, debieras pensar en participar!

“MEMORY OF THE MISSING”

Some artworks have the power to provoke and seduce at the same time, making us doubt our correctedness in “liking” something that represents a shocking reality. That is the case of Argentine artist, Alicia Chamot, whose artistic techniques create a visual blotter and enhancer in the face of a project dedicated to repudiate gender violence in all its manifestations.

alicia-chamot-5

 

invitacion5_resized“Memory of the Missing” (“Memoria de las que faltan”) is a powerful show presented by Alicia in Buenos Aires. She started it as a project in 2012 with “Gender Violence / Aggravated by Relationship,” which was exhibited at the National Visual Arts Salon in Buenos Aires the same year.

Convinced that art is the most powerful weapon against behavior bestiality, Alicia has followed up with a principal panel and various smaller works. The show was open to the public last week at the Casa de la Cultura in Quilmes, Buenos Aires province. For the main panel, she asked the community for photographs of faces of women, whose participation represented their rejection to all types of violence. The piece has 192 photographs in reddish hues, sewn over spheres, together with empty black modules representing missing women.

Most participants are smiling. Their faces seem like fragments of a multitude of “we the women of all times, anywhere.” The piece is a commemoration of those who are missing, and at the same time represents a celebration of life. Therefore, Alicia presents life and death while protesting gender violence.imagen-196

TelarAcha® is Alicia’s own technique, which combines regular weaving, with simultaneous volume weaving while still on the loom. The piece in exhibition displays burned sections depicting death by fire, which happened to several Argentine women some time ago.

alicia-chamot-4                                                            The panel measures 8 X 10 feet (2.5 X 3 meters), and includes weaving, moulding, sublimination, burn, and embroidery.

alicia-chamot-1alicia-chamot-2Contact: aliciachamot <aliciachamot@gmail.com> https://www.facebook.com/Telaracha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Crafts Competition 2016, Argentina

The richness and cultural diversity of each region in Latin America, are represented by its crafts.

Argentina is a highly textile country, where an incredible array of techniques are present in an equally incredible array of competitions and shows. Ranging from vegetable to animal fiber creation, you can see categories such as traditional Mapuche indigenous weaving, horse mount blankets, belting, leather textiles, textile jewelry and accessories, felt toys, felt garments, basketry, contemporary paper creation, and more.

The National Fund for the Arts in Buenos Aires, is a governmental entity that holds an annual competition of craft cuture at a national level: Concurso Nacional de Artesanías FNA 2016, which will open to the public on September 1st, with four textile categories: traditional crafts; rescue; neo-crafts: Contemporary expression; and textile projection.

 Susana Larrambebere. Shawl. Hand dyed, hand felted Merino over gauze, with applications.


Susana Larrambebere. Shawl. Hand dyed, hand felted Merino over gauze, with applications.

 

Susana Larrambebere. Shawl (detail). Hand dyed, hand felted Merino over gauze, with applications.

Susana Larrambebere. Shawl (detail). Hand dyed, hand felted Merino over gauze, with applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textile artist Susana Larrambebere from Buenos Aires, has won 2nd Prize in Felt Garments, within the Contemporary Textiles category. 

Her shawl was felted with exquisite Merino wool from Patagonia, over gauze with natural silk applications. It was dyed with purple and gold onions, walnut and acid aniline.

To see more of Susana’s creation, visit her site “El Cuarto De Las Lanitas”: http://www.elcuartodelaslanitas.com/     or her page on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/elcuarto.delaslanitas

 

 

 

Impressions from Afghanistan

 

09062011-09062011-P1150199Irene Carlos and I became friendly thanks to being members of the Surface Design Association at the time (2011,) and we also had a piece in the 4th WTA Biennial here in Costa Rica, so I admired her work even though I had not met her: She is a great visual artist from Guatemala.

That year, she was invited to visit in Afghanistan and, being a place of conflict, we didn’t expect her to be able to delve into textiles, but I anxiously awaited her letters and, of course, her photos.

Three skimpy letters arrived, with warnings not to publish location. I managed to make a full article out of them, without photographs. Some photos arrived later, but I didn’t get permission to publish them, so I didn’t.

Until now! I came across her article published by the European Textile Network, and quickly contacted her. The full story is fascinating:

She arrived in Herat, where she stayed for one month until unrest intensified in that city, leaving her to travel on her own. She visited Kabul first, and then Bamyan. I’m publishing her photos of Bamyan at the end.

May 24, 2011: In her first account she talked about her arrival, lodging, and other sensitive matters we could not publish. Afghanistan is, after all, a war area. The following letter was received this morning after a few days of silence. It promised me photographs that have arrived five years later: It turns out Irene sent the photos, but I did not receive them; then I got them, but couldn’t show them. Here is Irene’s second letter to me, which I posted so long ago:

“For security reasons I can’t tell you where I’m staying, but not much is going on at my refuge. I’ve been painting morning and afternoon, except when Hassina waits for me by the door in her blue chador—then my life brightens up. We roam the streets of Herat seeing historic monuments, the Citadella, bazaars, side-streets full of dust and open gutters. Right then it would never occur to you that there’s a war going on in this country. Everyone seems more worried about their daily shopping, and you see streets full of women in light blue burkas and black or grey chadors. It’s inconceivable that in a desert country the fabrics utilized by women are a hundred percent polyester; yet underneath the burka or chador there are more layers of cloth, like the obligatory scarf that covers head and shoulders, long tunics, and pants. I find myself asking Hassina if she’s not cooking in there, and she answers she no longer thinks about it, ’cause there’s nothing she can do about it. Indeed, we get exhausted under the ardent sun: there’s not a cloud, or a small café to sit awhile. We wait until lunch time to look for a restaurant where there’s only women, or a family-style one where the men are out front in the first room. At the latter we continue down the hallway to sit in the women’s area as close as possible to a small fan to reduce the intense steam from kitchen and desert, but under the chador we continue to roast.
An order of lamb and basmati rice, with pomegranate and saffron fried seeds as garnish actually breaks the routine of eating pasta and salad, salad and pasta, and okra, spinach and potatoes eaten daily at my refuge.
Today I’m going to an Afghan wedding; I’m leaving in a few minutes. I’ll be alone in the women’s area, without knowing a soul, but hoping to see with my very own eyes something I wouldn’t be able to see otherwise. I thank my friend, who invited me over to Afghanistan.”
—Irene Carlos, Guatemala
P.S. Photographs will follow as soon as I can find a computer to send them!
—Translation by Silvia Piza-Tandlich
13052011-13052011-P1140356 15052011-15052011-P1140477

“…It’s inconceivable that in a desert country the fabrics utilized by women are a hundred percent polyester…” Quote and photo: Irene Carlos

17052011-17052011-P1140580 17052011-17052011-P1140589 17052011-17052011-P1140591 22052011-22052011-P1140750 22052011-22052011-P1140757

Men tend to their stores, where women are not allowed to work. Yet, the Afghan culture is quite friendly.
22052011-22052011-P114076822052011-22052011-P114077022052011-22052011-P114077823062011-23062011-P117096623062011-23062011-P1170982-223062011-23062011-P117098223062011-23062011-P1180057

Amir is a weaver and owner of “Pamir Kashmir” distributor on Chicken Street in Kabul. Photo: Irene Carlos

23062011-23062011-P118009023062011-23062011-P118009823062011-23062011-P1180138

Irene entering Amir’s distributing store in Kabul. Pashminas on the ground floor, and all the weaving operation upstairs, men weave and women make rugs. Photo: Irene Carlos

Note, 2016: May I congratulate Irene Carlos on her latest article, published by the European Textile Network. 

—Silvia Piza-Tandlich

14079760_1624526381172017_6854910576446729134_n14051752_1624526374505351_5254070599157139526_n

 
Bamyan, capital of the province of Bamyan in central Afghanistan, means "The Place of Shining Light." Its population of 62,000 still shows traces of a blend of Greek, Turkish, Persian, Chinese, and Indian cultures since the town sits on the ancient Silk Route, forming now the Hazara ethnic group of Afghanistan. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Bamyan, capital of the province of Bamyan in central Afghanistan, means “The Place of Shining Light.” Its population of 62,000 still shows traces of a blend of Greek, Turkish, Persian, Chinese, and Indian cultures since the town sits on the ancient Silk Route, forming now the Hazara ethnic group of Afghanistan.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Bamyan stands out in History by its prominent Buddha sculptures, built in the 6th Century AD as a holy Buddhist site. They were 55 meters and 37 meters high, carved in sandstone. Demolished by the Taliban in March 2001 after being declared idols. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Bamyan stands out in History by its prominent Buddha sculptures, built in the 6th Century AD as a holy Buddhist site. They were 55 meters and 37 meters high, carved in sandstone.
Demolished by the Taliban in March 2001 after being declared idols.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Life is tough for people living in rural areas. Bamyan is a small town with a bazaar at its center. It has no infrastructure of electricity, gas, or water supplies. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Life is tough for people living in rural areas. Bamyan is a small town with a bazaar at its center. It has no infrastructure of electricity, gas, or water supplies.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Despite war and poverty, children in the countryside continue to be educated in school, while a textile tradition continues at home. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Despite war and poverty, children in the countryside continue to be educated in school, while a textile tradition continues at home.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

At last without the chador, Irene enjoys a little bit of fresh air and sightseeing in Shahr-e Zohak.

At last without the chador, Irene enjoys a little bit of fresh air and sightseeing in Shahr-e Zohak.

Waiting to enjoy sone Naan bread—the national bread of Afghanistan. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Waiting to enjoy sone Naan bread—the national bread of Afghanistan.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Herding and trading continue to be important in Bamyan life. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Herding and trading continue to be important in Bamyan life.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Female enrollment in schools in Bamiyan has surged in the last decade, and Bamyan now has a female governor. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Female enrollment in schools in Bamiyan has surged in the last decade, and Bamyan now has a female governor.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

Not the traditional fancy dresses, or the luxurious silk one would expect. Afghan clothing includes men's turbans, the Perahan with modern side slits, tsādar or shawl, the Firaq which is like a skirt, and the Partug or shalwar. Weather permitting, poor women prefer to wear the Chador, without having to display anything else. Photo: Irene Carlos.

Not the traditional fancy dresses, or the luxurious silk one would expect. Afghan clothing includes men’s turbans, the Perahan with modern side slits, tsādar or shawl, the Firaq which is like a skirt, and the Partug or shalwar. Weather permitting, poor women prefer to wear the Chador, without having to display anything else.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

A lot of activity in one of the deep blue lakes at Band-e Amir National Park near Bamyan City. Photo: Irene Carlos.

A lot of activity in one of the deep blue lakes at Band-e Amir National Park near Bamyan City.
Photo: Irene Carlos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our traveler posing with the lake beauty of Band-e Amir National Park behind her.

Our traveler posing with the lake beauty of Band-e Amir National Park behind her.